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20131202
20131210
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covering up some of the realities of how individuals regarded both the anc and more specifically, nelson mandela in all these eulogies? >> i think no doubt we are. nelson mandela's spiritual giant, political revolutionary, we are witnessing the santa clausification of nelson mandel. a we turned the revolutionary into an old man with a toy bag. no longer really full of the fire. we can at 95, brother nelson mandela was still full of fire. he had that militant tenderness and sub versive sweetness and radical gentleness, tied to refusing to be fearful or intimidated in the face of a vicious white supremacist apartheid regime. >> ted cruz, the senator from texas, paid respect on facebook. he said nelson mandela will live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe. someone said he was a murderer and a communist. another one said sad to see you feel this way. he was a terrorist. i guess you have only seen the hollywood movies. getting away from what the comment section of the internet generally is, let's talk about some of these specific charges. communist, terrorist. where do they c
. helping the u.s. do the right thing around apartheid. others felled no, nelson mandela is with the a.n.c., it was a terrorist organization so a.n.c. should not support. we saw on the ground an opportunity, an opportunity to make sure the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to south africa, making sure it did not support apartheid. >> talk about how nelson mandela influenced foreign state policy. >> an interesting thing is nelson mandela did not abandon friends. there's something i know, clinton talked about, he disagreed with nelson mandela on the issue of cuba and his relationship with fidel castro. nelson mandela did not forget his friends. they stood with him. making sure countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interests of their people, may not necessarily benefit all. all people around the planet knew that it is possible, that you can make the impossible possible. and that is what happened, and that is, to me, what his life embodied. >> that is why the world is remembering nelson mandela. >> thank you for your time today. >> thank you. >>
't even tell his anc colleagues that he was doing that. they negotiated for years in private in order to get this done. the persistence, the courage to do that was incredible. >> incredible courage and many occasions, he went against the leadership of the anc, the political movement. and didn't tell them or when he did tell them, he would essentially say i know this is not what you want me to do, but i feel it is the thing we must do and almost all instances, he was proven correct and he was somebody -- >> go ahead, had the respect of them so that they trusted him even though they had great reservations about the other side. >> they had great reservations. they argued with him. but never the less, he was so deserving of trust that even when they disagreed with him, they knew he was the leader and not the leader in a sense of i'm in charge, but in a sense of i am the purpose, the vision, the one who's going to get us there, so trust me. come along with me. walk with me and that was his great strength. >> thank you so much. >> we'll have much more on the life of nelson mandela and talk
of the guerrilla army, the formation, the armed wing of the anc and the chief of intelligence. slate got this succession of people from different parts of the liberation movement taking over who had been out of the country for longer to time, or had been imprisoned for laundries of time. and to a certain extent that shape some of the mistakes that have been made in the last yea years. >> does thabo mbeki talk but what surprised we came back after all those years and except? >> want to thank you quickly learn when you interview people or politicians and political power is nothing ever surprise them. so the main thing that upset him every time i was into being and is, i would ask that question what would surprise you to what was unusual, what jumped out at you? every, i would say that he would lean back, take a look at me with a lizardlike look when you know you have irritated him. and that would come. know, my brother, never surprised. never admit you were surprised. i think the things that surprised thabo mbeki certainly who was the second president of the liberated south africa was exte
in the anc's past and mandela said nice things about fidel castro and freedom in cuba that are false and that maybe because we bend over so backwards to show respect that that creates an opening. >> if there's anyone in modern history -- >> you disagree. i do, too. i'm just saying. >> we all agree if there's anyone in modern or world history that deserves sort of to be put on a pedestal, it's nelson mandela. >> of course. >> a few historical figures, right. but i think on both sides there is this danger of sort of writing out of history some of the controversial parts of his life that made him a great leader, made him able to end apartheid in that country. he took some very strong idealogical stands that are controversial to this day. conservatives were on the wrong side of history on a lot of these issues in the '70s and '80s. ted cruz doesn't have to worry about that. he's in his early 40s. he doesn't have to pay attention to that. >> what's extraordinary about mandela is his life's evolution. he started off as a militant, then was a political prisoner, then he became the national
to face during the time when he was a splinter unit in the anc. so that was his tactic. they would walk into places where he knew there was a congregation of people and put that message down. and, you know, we shot that scene in a similar way. we didn't tell the audience that i was playing mandela. we didn't tell them anything. they got dressed. they got into the costumes. and they watched that film for about six minutes or so. and cameras were on them watching them. then i walk in and do that. >> now -- go ahead, i'm sorry. >> there are people living in soweto. >> the people in the audience. >> we were very conscious to make sure people were represented from the community we were shooting in. >> this is in south africa. people can get a sense of mandela and what the environment was like. >> that was very important to the film makers to drop the audience right in amongst it and the actors amongst it. make sure we go into and had them in. and they made that. it was apartheid that effected people of south africa. so we needed them to be -- this is not a green screen movie. this is where a
movement, that we do the right thing around apartheid. mandela, he's with the a.n.c., and some considered that to be a terrorist organization. we had solidarity with people on the ground. we saw an opportunity to make sure that the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to africa and that was to make sure that we did not continue to support apartheid. >> tell us about his influence on the united states policy. >> he did not abandon friends. for example, something that i know president clinton has talked about, he always disagreed with president mandela on the issue of cuba and on his relationship with fidel castro. president mandela was not one to forget his friends. he also had such an impact on the african union and creation of the african union, making sure the countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interest of their people. sometimes that would not be necessarily what was in the best interest of our countries. he really works to make sure that it wasn't just the people of south africa has benefited from the struggle but that all people around
morning, and how wonderful it is to speak with you. mr. mandela was an anc member, actually one of the founders of the african national union. african national congress i was married to a south african freedom fighter was a member of the pac, pan-african congress. they were archrivals. mr. mandela came to egypt where i was living and i had been so used to these rivals arguing and shouting in the living room and in the streets against each other. there was also southwest africa national organization. when mr. mandela came he never had a crossword to say to anyone. i was amazed. i had never seen south africans who were that kind. he had a consummate to give to everybody including my housekeeper and the doorman, it was amazing. a gentle giant he was. >> schieffer: you know, you have written a wonderful poem celebrating his life and his passing. the state department has put it out on a video, i want to ask you about it, how it came about. let me play just a short clip of the beginning of this poem. >> the news came on the wings of the wind reluctant carry its burden. nelson mandela
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
africa membership of the anc, nelson mandela's organization, was a crime. his image was forbidden. his words from absolutely outlawed. even the possession of a coffee cup with his image on it was grounds for imprisonment. for all those years that he was in prison his image was absolutely obliterated. generations of south africans, grew up without knowing what he looked like, without knowing his speech or knowing his words. to know the absolutely joy that gripped the country when he and other african leaders were released from prison. here is somebody that had been spoken about in the quiet. that had been spoken about behind closed doors. anyone with support for him or his organization would mean imprisonment, banishment, and could mean and did mean in many cases, death. to understand the changes within this country one has to go back to that period of time when the person who's death and life is being celebrated at the moment was vilified, and regarded as subversive, regarded as a traitor to this state and many other states, and this shows you how time changes. south africans, in parti
of the a.n.c. during the '60s, who died and perhaps was killed by the south african government. a person with home your viewers may be aware of steve, murderedered in 1977. >> as we move forward and look at south africa and the issues and problems do you feel the legacy and mess age has been >> the legacy, and it goes back to the same people who fathered the youth league. south africa must be a place in which there's self determination. it goes back to the congress, going back to all who lives within it, everyone that participates in the governing structure. >> thank you for your insight. we appreciate it. >> french president issued a veiled warning to the leader of the central african republic. francis hollande warned it would be tough to keep central african republic's president in place given the worsening violence. 400 bodies have been found in the capital in the past three days. 10,000 fled the city. everyone has been ordered off the streets bar peacekeepers and bars. some images from this report may be disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. this is new to the city
'm a loyal member of the anc. the world had changed and had to go away from the socialist philosophy. he changed radically in a very short amount of time. one of the things he always said to me, he was never high bound about haenging his mind. he said when circumstances change i changed my mind. what do you do. another great lesson for politicians. so he evolved so tremendously when he came out of prison. it was astonishing to watch. >> it is astonishing. incredible story. >> the transition between icon to being in power is one of those impossible things to do. >> it was much more difficult coming out of prison and being a practical politician than being in prison. mandela's greatest teacher said i haven't had a good night's sleep since i left prison because now have responsibility. >> in 1994 brian williams interviewed nelson mandela. he asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk. >> my relationship with mr. de klerk and he's one of those south africans that i hold in high regard. we have had differences where we said cruel things to each other but at the end of the day, we're able t
economic and political waters. with the political icons demise the future of the a.n.c. is being thrown into question. mike hanna reports from johannesburg. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. in the void left by nelson mandela's death, an awareness of challenges to come. the growing gap between rich and poor is a reminder of nelson mandela's promise of a better life is to be realised. >> i think the challenge we have for nelson mandela is to face the reality that if we don't do something for everybody, the young people will revolt, because if they remain poor and others are richer then they revolt. >> the fault lines within south african society is all-too clear of it was a labour dispute ruling in the killing of 30 at the mary carna mine -- marikana mine. many argue that the root cause was a government losing touch with those that put it in power. >> if you look at what happened over the last few years in terms of public violence, you can see that we have many, many people that don't feel represented by those in government. and the resort to violence is because we don'
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when you see these images. thank you. appreciate that. the image of bill clinton at robben island, what an amazing treat to see that up close. >> you've got world leaders going there, including he was very critical of george w. bush over the iraq war and bush is heading down there. he was critical of the united states way back in 2003. i think he said if there's a krntd has committed unspeakable an frosties, it is the united sta
about 8%. let all two to the lobby, shall we, and get ourselves some stock? anc theater gearing up to go public. most loyal customers buying shares. members of anc sub rewards program, they offered the same price as bank and wall street zugs institutions according to jerry lopez, so everybody getting in on the action. >> the only thing i care about is what this means for ticket prices. i am saying it is expensive to go to the movies. >> i don't think you will see prices go up. i think they are sharing the love. >> sharing the love, is that what they're doing? >> exactly. thanks, allison. coming up next on "new day," budget de ja vu. four days and counting until congress can get its act together this time around. accidence of u.s. leaders convergeing on south africa, paying tribute to nelson mandela. chris cuomo is there live. he is speaking which someone who knew mandela well. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and
wanted to negotiate with him and then on the anc side there were extreme blacks who wanted can carry on the armed struggle and moderate blacks. his party was driven with factions as well and it was only his own, what i think was the difference between the way south africa went and the way other countries went was his own personal leadership skills. jon: yeah and amazing that he developed those skills in the way he did because most politicians kind of learn a little bit at time on the job, you know, from dinners to elections to higher and higher offices. he spent much of his adult life in prison and yet when emerged from prison he was not a bitter, vengeful man. what can you tell us about his thoughts on that? >> right. he spent years, 23 hours out of 24, staring at a blank wall. what kind of training does that give you? he was 71 when he came out of prison. most people, that, spending that long in prison would probably want to go and retire. so, and i think, perhaps one of the things that he learned at that time when he had all those hours to think was that he managed, even though he
in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to aci
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20